Home > Money Management > 3 Ways to Say ‘No’ to Overspending Pressure

3 Ways to Say ‘No’ to Overspending Pressure

3 Ways to Say ‘No’ to Overspending PressureThe society that we live in today is one of overspending and consumerism. Many people measure their worth against everyone else by the things that they own, rather than the person that they are and what they contribute to society.

In addition to the unhealthy nature of consumerism, overspending is an easy way to blow through your budget – even if you have a great job and a good salary.

To keep your financial life on track well into the future, you are going to need to find ways to ignore the silent, and not-so-silent, pressure to overspend on things you don’t need. Here are 3 ways to say ‘no’ to overspending pressure.

Be Proud of Yourself

By far, the biggest key to keep yourself on track on this point is simply to remember that you are far more important than the things you own. If someone else is going to judge you by the items that you possess rather than who you are – that is their problem. You can’t do anything about how others are going to view you, so forget about their opinions and focus on only what is best for you and your family.

Do you really need the new car with the upgraded interior and fancy stereo? Probably not – and you shouldn’t be swayed toward buying that expensive package just as a way to impress your neighbors.

Set a Budget

When you live within the confines of a specific budget, you will find it much easier to avoid falling into the trap of overspending for no good reason. By sticking to your budget, buying decisions will quickly become very easy – either you can afford something, or you can’t. There is no gray area within a good budget, which is why they work so well for families trying to make sure they can stay on the right financial track.

Take some time to work out a budget that makes sense based on your salary and the needs of your family, and then stick to that budget as closely as possible in the months and years ahead.

Look Around Your House

If you catch yourself thinking that owning a certain product is going to make your life significantly better, you can look to the past to disprove those feelings. How many things around your house have been purchased for the same reason? How much money have you spent in the past on things that you didn’t end up using all that much once you paid for them? It is common to covet certain material things only to find that they don’t really make much of a difference in your life after all.

Overspending pressure is a real force in the world today, and it can come from a variety of places. Whether it is a TV commercial telling you that you need a new cell phone, or someone at work asking why you haven’t bought a new car, the pressure comes from all around you. However, it is possible to step aside from that pressure as long as you have a plan – and a budget. Good luck!

 

How do you deal with overspending pressure? Where does the overspending pressure in your life come from?

 

Photo courtesy of: Clker-Free-Vector-Images

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John Schmoll is a Dad, husband and veteran of the financial services industry. He's passionate about helping people learn from his mistakes so that they can live lives free from the shackles of debt and empowered to make their money work for them. You can check out his other sites: Frugal Rules, for ways to improve your financial literacy; and Sprout Wealth for tips on different ways to make more money. John has been featured on Forbes, Lifehacker, Yahoo Finance and US News & World Report and more. If you're wanting to grow your blog, check out my blog coaching services to see how I can help you take your site to the next level.

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2 comments

  1. I love that image showing being chained to a TV. I really do believe that most of us would be rather content with our “stuff” and our lifestyles if we weren’t constantly bombarded with the thought of “more” and “different”. TV commercials are the worst impact in this area. My wife and I don’t watch a ton of TV, but when we do, 99% of the time it is something we recorded on the DVR. Then we can scan through the commercials and avoid the brainwashing.

  2. I focus on myself, how I can become a better person especially on finances. Most people are so consumed by advertising, encouraging them how to be the people they idolize and look up, which I think is not wrong. There are many people who spend a lot and get themselves in debt just to get the things they like.

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