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5 Tips for Resisting Impulse Credit Card Purchases

The problem with impulse shopping, well there are more than just one problem, is that the unplanned spending adds up quickly. You know it’s not the smartest thing to buy that seventeenth pair of earrings at the checkout, or those end of season boots don’t you? Yet you get home after your quick trip to the store and find these ‘no-no’ items have somehow found their way into your house, and the charges have magically appeared on your credit card statements. Having gone through paying off debt myself, I know the challenge it can be to avoid impulse spending on a credit card and below are some tips to counteract that desire to give into impulse spending. If you have gotten yourself in hot water with your credit card, you may need to contact an expert debt solutions provider such as Debt Rescue.

Waiting Period

Cooling off periods are common enough when it comes to almost any kind of contract these days and there’s no reason why you can’t enter into a contract with yourself. Give yourself a cooling off period. Be tough; try 30 days. If there’s anything you’re tempted to impulse buy on your credit card, make yourself a deal: hold off for 30 days. If you still want it by then, you can get it – assuming you have the funds to do so of course. 🙂 Chances are, in 30 days you won’t even remember which online shopping site you were on when you saw it.

Leave The Credit Cards At Home

This is one of the easier ways to avoid impulse spending on your credit card. Having the credit card in your wallet will only tempt you if you’re struggling with impulse spending. Leaving the card at home will automatically remove that temptation as you can’t use it. Don’t allow yourself to think that you’ll only use it for emergencies as that only brings about the possibility of talking yourself into spending. Simply put, if you don’t have your card on you then it can’t be used.

Make It Easy To Resist

If you find yourself whipping out your credit card every time you go shopping, avoid them. Make this easy for yourself by having your groceries delivered. Once you’ve set this up online, you’ll find you’re far less likely to stray from your shopping list when your grocery run is virtual. Having it delivered means you won’t spend time at the checkout, and be tempted to spend on small items you don’t need. You don’t have to do it forever; just until you’ve got your impulse buying under control.

The Real Cost

Change the way you think about what you’re spending. Instead of telling yourself ‘that’s only $9.99 – and on sale, and I could use one…’ try reminding yourself how hard you had to work to earn that money. How many minutes? Before tax? How many customers did you have to serve, or papers did you have to file, or presentations did you have to deliver? How many hours did you sit in traffic to get to work to earn that cash? Understanding exactly how much of your blood, sweat and tears went into your pay packet makes it easier to be more selective about where that money goes.

Plan Your Spending

Lists are a good way to keep your focus when you do have to go out and spend money. If you need to head anywhere to buy things, even clothes, make a list – and stick to it. Discipline is the key.

Impulse purchases may not seem like a big deal at the time, but they can add up quickly If you are having trouble resisting impulse credit card purchases, it’s time to get tough with yourself. With a few strategies and some self discipline, you’ll soon be back on track.

 

 

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John Schmoll is a Dad, husband and veteran of the financial services industry. He's passionate about helping people learn from his mistakes so that they can live lives free from the shackles of debt and empowered to make their money work for them. You can check out his other sites: Frugal Rules, for ways to improve your financial literacy; and Sprout Wealth for tips on different ways to make more money. John has been featured on Forbes, Lifehacker, Yahoo Finance and US News & World Report and more. If you're wanting to grow your blog, check out my blog coaching services to see how I can help you take your site to the next level.

One comment

  1. I bring my credit card always because I have full control over it. Before it was hard and I was easily tempted to use it when the card was still new. But, after the experience of being in debt for some months due to unpaid bills, I learned how to use it wisely and to control usage even I have it with me. Thanks for the other tips John.
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